Hiking in Fishlake National Forest

Some of Our Favorite Fishlake National Forest Hiking Trails


Fishlake National Forest has over twenty excellent hiking trails for you to enjoy. Many of the best trails in the area are rated difficult, but a few are easy to moderate. We've listed a few of our favorites, below. For more information about hiking in the Fishlake National Forest, give us a call. We're very familiar with the area, and we're happy to share our knowledge with you.

Bullion Falls

  • Distance: 2.0 miles out and back
  • Elevation gain: 449 feet
  • Rating: Easy to Moderate
Bullion Falls Trail is a short, easy trail that starts at Miner's Park, runs through aspen groves, and ends at Bullion Falls, a majestic waterfall that plummets 75 feet down Bullion Canyon. Along the way, you'll be treated to excellent views of Utah's Tushar Mountains. Dogs and horses are allowed along this trail.

Sunglow Trail

  • Distance: 1.0 miles out and back
  • Elevation gain: 213 feet
  • Rating: Moderate

Don't let the moderate rating and short distance of Sunglow Trail fool you: This trail requires quite a bit of scrambling over and around rocks and muddy creek crossings. If you're looking for a pleasant stroll through the woods, pick another trail; otherwise, this is an entertaining hike you'll want to try. Dogs are welcome, but, if you bring one, it must be on a leash.

Delano Ridgeline Trail

  • Distance: 3.8 miles out and back
  • Elevation gain: 984 feet
  • Rating: Moderate

Rated as a moderate hike, Delano Ridgeline Trail is actually a relatively easy, gentle trail that winds through scenic fields of wildflowers. Along the way, you'll get great views of Mount Belknap, Mount Baldy, and, of course, Delano Peak, the tallest mountain in the Tuschar Mountains. Dogs are welcome along Delano Ridgeline Trail.

Delano Peak

  • Distance: 3.0 miles out and back
  • Elevation gain: 1,650 feet
  • Rating: Difficult

Delano Peak is the tallest peak in the Tushars. The trail to Delano Peak is rated a difficult, but because it runs along gentle slopes, the rating may be somewhat inflated. Along the way, you're treated to some of the best views of any trail in southwest Utah. The hike is appropriate for all ages and skill levels. Dogs are welcome on this trail.

Fish Lake Loop

  • Distance: 16.2 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1886 feet
  • Rating: Difficult

Fish Lake Loop is a lengthy trail, rated as difficult. As the name implies, the trail loops around Fish Lake, offering beautiful views of the lake all along the way. Difficulty varies quite a bit on the loop, depending on which side of Fish Lake you're hiking. The west side is relatively easy, while the east side is difficult. Added bonus: If you do this hike in the summer, you'll come across wild raspberries. Dogs are welcome on this trail.

Fish Lake Hightop

  • Distance: 9.5 miles out and back
  • Elevation gain: 2,667 feet
  • Rating: Difficult

Fish Lake Hightop trail runs along the west-northwest plateau above Fish Lake. Rated as difficult, this challenging hike offers fantastic view of many of Utah's most well-know peaks. Look to the north, and you'll see Mount Nebo, near Nephi, Utah. Look to the southwest and you'll see Mount Baldy and Mount Belknap in the Tuschar Mountains. Dogs and horses are allowed on Fish Lake Hightop.

Fool Creek Peak

  • Distance: 8.1 miles out and back
  • Elevation gain: 3,238 feet
  • Rating: Difficult

The trail to the top of Fool's Creek Peak is a difficult one. The trial head is located about three miles up Walker Canyon. From there, it's a strenuous four-hour hike to the summit. The last mile is at an elevation of over 9,000 feet, and the trail typically has quite a bit of overgrowth, with limited trail markings. You'll want to make sure you bring a good topography map and know how to use it. You won't be able to phone for help or advice, since cell reception is not available. All in all, if you're hiking at a normal pace, expect to spend around eight hours getting to the peak and back. Dogs are allowed on the Fool Creek Peak trail.

Ready to hike in Fishlake National Forest?